Investments

Exclusive vs. Inclusive Investing

There are many different approaches to investing in the stock market, but most fall under two categories: exclusive and inclusive. Exclusive means conducting thorough research on prospective companies and investing in a portfolio of select, thoroughly vetted securities. One of the advantages of this approach is that if an investor’s research pans out, he could…

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Goals-Based Investing

There’s a difference between monitoring an investment and checking its performance on a daily basis. Rather than being concerned about short-term volatility in the market, consider the future purpose or goal of what you want your money to pay for. This is the fundamental idea behind goals-based investing. You don’t just seek out investments that…

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What Type of Investor Are You?

Each person is unique. We are composed of many variables, such as genetics, family influence, geographic influence and even the birth order among siblings – a veritable combination of the forces of biology and society.1 So when it comes to managing your finances, the debate isn’t about nature versus nurture; it’s both. For example, consider…

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Preventing Elderly Financial Abuse

A recent study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College concluded that many retirees who do not suffer from any cognitive impairment can still manage their money through their 70s and 80s.1 The study reports that financial capacity relies on accumulated knowledge and that knowledge stays mostly intact as we age. However, the…

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What Is Evidence-Based Investing?

The evidence-based approach originated in the medical field to promote the use of clinical experience and the best available research to make decisions about individual patient care.1 In the investing world, this translates to a goal of using current evidence to help maximize an individual’s investment returns while minimizing risk from market downturns.2 In more…

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Savings and Investment Updates

The American College of Financial Services recently posted some surprising results from its Retirement Income Literacy Quiz. Nearly three-quarters of respondents ages 60 to 75 failed the test with a score of 60 percent or less.1 The quiz included topics such as which expenses are covered by Medicare and long-term care insurance and what age…

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